Nutrition

Spring Clean Your Liver

by Juanita Fuchs on October 21, 2014 · 0 comments

Chinese Medicine dietary advice for health and wellness through the seasons.

 

Let’s talk about spring… While winter was a time to conserve energy and reduce activity, spring is a time of regeneration and new beginnings. Seeds sprout, flowers bloom, and the sun warms the earth. You only have to look outside to see and feel the changes in the air! Spring is the ideal time for cleansing and rejuvenation for overall health and well-being.

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Vietnamese Fresh Spring Roll Recipe

by Elysia Humphries - Naturopath on September 4, 2014 · 0 comments

 

 Well the sun is shining, the flowers are blooming, Spring is upon us. What better time to try new fresh recipes with some herbs from the garden!

I got this recipe while on an overnight cruise in Halong Bay in Hanoi – I thought I would share, as they taste yummy, and are gluten-free and dairy-free! [read more....…]

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Winter Immune Boosting Tips

by Elysia Humphries - Naturopath on May 31, 2012 · 0 comments

It’s that time of year when everyone starts to get sick.  Kids average six to eight colds a year and adults between two and four.  Everyone has experienced the feeling of a tickle in their throat, a runny nose or the building up of mucus in their sinus cavities.  This is our bodies sending us signals to slow down and rest!  Now is the time to get plenty of sleep, eat nutritious foods and have plenty of fluids.  It is vital to our health to make smart lifestyle choices and listen to our bodies. The choices we make affect our own immune system, the immune system of our families, as well as our general health and wellbeing.

Here are some tips to help boost your immunity this autumn and prevent colds and flus:

 

Tea and water

  • Drink plenty of water however make sure to avoid cold (from fridge) drinks.
  • Black tea, white tea and green tea contain antioxidants and polyphenols which contain anti inflammatory properties.
  • Thyme tea helps sooth the throat and coughing as well as and relieving headaches. Thyme is an expectorant, which means it helps to shift the mucous build up in the chest.  Use fresh thyme sprigs for each cup of tea.
  • Hot water, lemon and manuka honey tea:  The anti-bacterial honey, the alkalising lemon and the warming hot water make this the perfect combination to nourish, hydrate and flush out the flu. [read more....…]

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Wholefoods vs Fad Foods

by Elysia Humphries - Naturopath on April 14, 2012 · 0 comments

wholefoods vs fad foods by nutritionist brisbane

These days life is fast, we’re working harder, for longer hours and trying to balance keeping fit, eating well and spending time with our loved ones. Show’s like Master Chef and Jamies Kitchen have become hugely popular, but I must admit even though they make me dream of all the fabulous new adventurous foods I would love to cook, the reality is that I’m so busy working as a Naturopath in Brisbane, that I don’t cook as often as I’d like to.  My answer is to have some quick, easy dinner options ready to go in the freezer that I’ve done up in a big old slow cooker.

In the 1950’s the average woman spent around 20 hours per week preparing food and cleaning up.  These days, women average 5.5 hours per week, even less for full time workers! So the dilemma is “how do I eat well when I live such a busy lifestyle?”

The modern solution we’ve all become so used to is convenience foods. Everything comes in a package these days, some foods look so different to their original state that they’re hard to recognize. Have a sneak peek into most peoples trolley’s at the super market  and everything’s in boxes, wrapped in plastic and tins. How many of the ingredients listed in the foods on the supermarket shelves these days would your Grandma have recognized when she was a girl? Food has changed from is original state and we’ve all gotten used to it without questioning it. The question we need to ask ourselves is “is this food nourishing my body?”  and “what are all these numbers and ingredients added to my food that I don’t recognize?”

Foods these days are marketed to us, appealing to us with claims such as “diet” “low fat” or “sugar free.” Take this ingredients list from a popular diet yoghurt, Yoplait forme: consider how many of these ingredients you recognize and if you think they would be easy to digest and healthy for your body: THICKENERS (1442 (FROM TAPIOCA), 440), GELATINE, SWEETENERS (950, 951), ACIDITY REGULATOR (331), FLAVOURS, NATURAL COLOURS (160b, 120), MALTODEXTRIN (FROM MAIZE), PRESERVATIVE (202), FIRMING AGENT (509), ENZYME (LACTASE)

An easy way to navigate your way through this minefield of processed, fake foods is to give them  the flick and opt for nutritious whole foods.  I opt for Jalna natural yoghurt – no nasties!

Whole foods are foods eaten as close to their original, natural state as possible. Whole foods are all about getting the maximum bang for your buck nutrition wise. They are full of vitamins and minerals, fiber and are most importantly easy for your body to process. Not sure if you’re eating whole foods?  Start reading the ingredients list on your food labels and if you don’t recognize a number or an ingredient, then don’t buy that food.

An example of a whole food breakfast cereal would be Continue Reading

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